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JROS (Jury-Rigged O'Reilly Special) Resonator Delete

Nossy

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#1
Was inspired by these guys and a desire for a bit more sound out of my new ST without spending a fortune on an exhaust. Also didn't feel like going to an exhaust shop (because I'm now a hermit), so I used off the shelf parts I could install in my driveway without a welder. I was also impatient, so found stuff I could get shipped to me in a few days. Hopefully you've caught on by this point that this is not a fancy modification, thus my name for it - the Jury-Rigged O'Reilly Special - but figured I'd post up some info for anyone who feels like getting a bit more sound out of the ST. I think it turned out OK, definitely picked up a bit of sound, we'll see how long I keep it this way. Would have preferred to use an X-pipe, but I couldn't find one easily, likely would have changed the sound a bit.

Took a little over an hour on ramps in my driveway. Would have taken half the time if I had a blade for my Sawzall and didn't have to use a hacksaw, but hey, that just adds to the Jury-Rigged part of the experience... I cut off the stock resonator at the rear, unbolted from the front, replaced with two straight-through pipes and clamped the bastards down. Parts list below.

Nickson Exhaust Pipe Connector, Part# 548510, Qty: 2, $6.58
Nickson 2-1/8 Exhaust Clamp, Part# 511213, Qty: 6, $8.34
Nickson Tail Pipe Extension, Part# 17674, Qty: 2, $25.98
Total shipped from O'Reilly $45.09

Sound clips here: 2020 Explorer ST Resonator Delete

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STFan

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#3
That sounds pretty good!
 

LoneShark

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#4
Dude, you’d be wise to put some sort of h/x pipe back in there. Engines don’t prefer to run as 2 separate banks. All engines have a balance pipe on the exhaust for a reason.
Granted I’m new to this platform, but believe the resonator is the only cross over on the exhaust system.
 

Nossy

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#5
Dude, you’d be wise to put some sort of h/x pipe back in there. Engines don’t prefer to run as 2 separate banks. All engines have a balance pipe on the exhaust for a reason.
Granted I’m new to this platform, but believe the resonator is the only cross over on the exhaust system.
Yes, and that would have cost more than $45 shipped to my door. There were no off the shelf x/h-pipes that would drop into this location without any welding, which was my intent.

The system has been replaced with a Thermal R&D system, but it's honestly too quiet for my tastes.
 
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Knoxville, TN
#6
Dude, you’d be wise to put some sort of h/x pipe back in there. Engines don’t prefer to run as 2 separate banks. All engines have a balance pipe on the exhaust for a reason.
Granted I’m new to this platform, but believe the resonator is the only cross over on the exhaust system.
And the advice that "engines don't prefer to run as 2 separate banks." is based on what?
 
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#7
Sounds not too bad. If nothing else the down facing stock tips can be used as a super-wide driveway leaf blower:D.
 

zdubyadubya

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#8
And the advice that "engines don't prefer to run as 2 separate banks." is based on what?
I started to type up a really long-winded response to that post and then just gave up. If people didn't learn anything in the "all engines need some level of exhaust backpressure" thread, then there isn't hope here either. There are just too many old habits/wives tales out there to try and squash them all.
 
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#9
I started to type up a really long-winded response to that post and then just gave up. If people didn't learn anything in the "all engines need some level of exhaust backpressure" thread, then there isn't hope here either. There are just too many old habits/wives tales out there to try and squash them all.
Engines needing back pressure (2 strokes are different) ranks right up there with "Horsepower is good, but torque wins races"! My Dad who worked at Oldsmobile all his life still swears that he witnessed a "red" carburetor that made 100 mpg. Of course, it was quickly quashed by "Big Oil".
 

LoneShark

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I started to type up a really long-winded response to that post and then just gave up. If people didn't learn anything in the "all engines need some level of exhaust backpressure" thread, then there isn't hope here either. There are just too many old habits/wives tales out there to try and squash them all.
I did not say a single thing about “needing back pressure”

To answer the original question - dyno charts prove that engines make better power with the banks balanced than do as two separate entities. That’s the whole purpose of an x-pipe. Do some research. :geek:

If you want to back up your argument that it’s not needed, find me a single engine/vehicle (other than top fuel dragster) that doesn’t link the exhaust banks.
 
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#11
I did not say a single thing about “needing back pressure”

To answer the original question - dyno charts prove that engines make better power with the banks balanced than do as two separate entities. That’s the whole purpose of an x-pipe. Do some research. :geek:

If you want to back up your argument that it’s not needed, find me a single engine/vehicle (other than top fuel dragster) that doesn’t link the exhaust banks.
Probably +90% of engines do not use an h/x pipe. There are two reasons for "balance pipes". In a typical cross-plane v8 (as opposed to a flat plane crankshaft) it can help to even exhaust pulses since the banks are not firing at the same interval. This is probably the example to which you're referring. It can also help if you're using a restrictive dual exhaust (no matter what engine you have), since it allows the exhaust flow to "see" a lower pressure differential. On an even fire v6 as the ST has, its role is in acoustics and heat retention.
 
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zdubyadubya

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#12
Probably +90% of engines do not use an h/x pipe. There are two reasons for "balance pipes". In a typical cross-plane v8 (as opposed to a flat plane crankshaft) it can help to even exhaust pulses since the banks are not firing at the same interval. This is probably the example to which you're referring. It can also help if you're using a restrictive dual exhaust (no matter what engine you have), since it allows the exhaust flow to "see" a lower pressure differential. On an even fire v6 as the ST has, its role is in acoustics and heat retention.
Expanding upon what TMac said, there is no need for an X or H pipe after a turbocharger. There are no typical exhaust pulses after the turbo (as opposed to a naturally aspirated engine), so there are no benefits from scavenging, balancing, etc. After the turbo, the exhaust's work is done. Get it out as quickly and easily as possible. HOWEVER, X-Pipes and H-Pipes are extremely useful for acoustics modifications and to help design/customize the exhaust sound.
 

UNBROKEN

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#13
Expanding upon what TMac said, there is no need for an X or H pipe after a turbocharger. There are no typical exhaust pulses after the turbo (as opposed to a naturally aspirated engine), so there are no benefits from scavenging, balancing, etc. After the turbo, the exhaust's work is done. Get it out as quickly and easily as possible. HOWEVER, X-Pipes and H-Pipes are extremely useful for acoustics modifications and to help design/customize the exhaust sound.
Which is the ONLY reason I have an X pipe in this thing.
 

LoneShark

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#14
Probably +90% of engines do not use an h/x pipe.
Not saying I’ve seen every engine setup in the world, but I have yet to see any engine with 2 banks, that didn’t have a merge/crossover/balance/H/Y/X pipe.
 

zdubyadubya

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#15
Not saying I’ve seen every engine setup in the world, but I have yet to see any engine with 2 banks, that didn’t have a merge/crossover/balance/H/Y/X pipe.
I'm not sure about TMac's percentages but like I mentioned, we have to reduce our "every engine setup in the world" to the Venn diagram of: two banks, naturally aspirated, and true dual exhaust (not single muffler, dual tip) for us to discuss this topic and that class of cars (especially modern cars) is pretty small. The only example I can think of is the 2006?ish GTO. The marketing materials when that car came out made a big stink about a true dual exhaust setup. pics on the internet lend credence to there being no crossover pipe.

expanding upon this thought thread though, for OUR particular vehicle and any other modern vehicle where engineers, NVH folks, and acoustics specialists get involved, there WILL be an X pipe/crossover/balance/etc. because it makes for a better sounding exhaust note. Jason Cammisa does a good bit on how the unequal length of exhaust pipes in modern cars needs to be managed and why tricks like these and helmholtz chambers become useful.

Why some engines sound the way they do | Know It All with Jason Cammisa | Ep.02 - YouTube
 

LoneShark

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I'm not sure about TMac's percentages but like I mentioned, we have to reduce our "every engine setup in the world" to the Venn diagram of: two banks, naturally aspirated, and true dual exhaust (not single muffler, dual tip) for us to discuss this topic and that class of cars (especially modern cars) is pretty small. The only example I can think of is the 2006?ish GTO. The marketing materials when that car came out made a big stink about a true dual exhaust setup. pics on the internet lend credence to there being no crossover pipe.

expanding upon this thought thread though, for OUR particular vehicle and any other modern vehicle where engineers, NVH folks, and acoustics specialists get involved, there WILL be an X pipe/crossover/balance/etc. because it makes for a better sounding exhaust note. Jason Cammisa does a good bit on how the unequal length of exhaust pipes in modern cars needs to be managed and why tricks like these and helmholtz chambers become useful.

Why some engines sound the way they do | Know It All with Jason Cammisa | Ep.02 - YouTube
Make whatever Venn diagram you feel is necessary - the point is no one can provide a single example of a V engine that does not use a balance pipe of some sort.
I strongly believe there is must be undebatable benefits to using one - so much so that every auto manufacturer in the world (until proven otherwise) uses it. And I’m sure it’s more than just acoustics, as that is subjective - and several on the site commented that unlinked banks sounded better (ie. No resonator).
The GTOs did have linked exhaust banks.
Here on 04 you can see the h pipe.
http://www.2040-parts.com/2004-pontiac-gto-oem-catback-exhaust-ls1-5-7l-v8-original-parts-i1477518/

and here on 05+ when they switched to the ls2

https://images.app.goo.gl/cttGzTUNTSPX79iv5
 

UNBROKEN

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#17
Argue all ya want…they provide exactly zero performance, scavenging or other benefit on a twin turbo V engine outside of sound tuning.
 


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