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Anyone breaking in their engine for the first 1,000 miles?

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Location
Tucson, AZ
#1
Who else is breaking in their engine?
 

merco

New Member
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Location
Redwood City, CA, USA
#3
Yes, I did. Other manufacturers like BMW publish details on how to properly break in an engine. I used to have a BMW X5 M, and performed the below method for the break-in period.

Here is BMW's recommendation:

The right way to break in a new car
Many drivers wonder whether breaking in a new car is still necessary or if this practice has been superseded with the advances in technology. The answer? Yes and no...
Doing an engine break-in used to be a standard procedure with new cars. And it’s still the case that you should avoid running the engine at high RPM for the first 1,300 miles. Experts recommend a maximum 3,500 rpm and 90 mph in diesel models and 4,500 rpm and 100 mph in gas models. This will give the engine and transmission sufficient time to adjust to each other. Once you’ve reached the 1,300-mile mark, you can gradually increase your speed and your engine’s RPM. In particular, avoid putting too much strain on a cold engine. However, that’s true not just when breaking in a new car but for the whole life cycle of your car. Likewise, never turn off an engine that has been running hard. Allow it to cool down by driving a few miles at a gentle pace.

During the new car break-in period, take note of the following tips:
  • For the first 200 miles, new tires will not yet provide full grip. This is because a release lubricant used in the manufacturing process has to be worn away from the tire surface. Adjust your driving accordingly to prevent accidents.
  • Similarly, the brakes won’t become fully effective for the first 300 miles as the brake pads and discs will need to adjust to one other. You should, therefore, drive cautiously.
  • The shock absorbers and springs will also need some time to become fully effective. That’s why you should not push your new car to its limits during the first 1,000 miles or so.
While many engine break-in tips also apply to modern engines, one compulsory rule for new cars has disappeared, as it’s no longer necessary to change the engine oil after the first 1,000 miles. You should, however, also keep these break-in practices in mind when replacing individual components later on.

https://www.bmw.com/en/automotive-life/break-in-a-new-car.html
 
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Location
Phoenix, AZ, USA
#4
In other words, drive like grandma for the first 1300 hundred miles in your high-performance SUV.
Oh the humanity!
 
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Location
Vancouver, WA, USA
#6
One of the things to remember is to vary the speed and not stay at one speed for long periods as in cruise control. If you do use the cruise control, change the speed up and down regularly.
 
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Location
Secaucus, NJ, USA
#7
yeah, poor car saw all speeds and manners of driving.. 90 degree weather in orlando and a surprise snow storm in north carolina.. pulled over for speeding in south jersey, valet parked in disney springs, and got a chip in the windshield somewhere in georgia.. already fixed, already tinted.. we have a long history for less than a week of ownership.
 
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Location
Los Angeles, CA, USA
#8
I broke ours in with 26 miles on the odometer, by giving it wide open throttle. for a couple dozen runs over the course of a few weeks. new engines need to be revved out to make sure everything is seated correctly.
 
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Location
Burlington, ON, Canada
#9
My general break-in procedure is to avoid overly beating on the car (but still giving it the beans a few times here and there to help things bed in) for the first 1-2,000km, keeping the speeds varied, and changing the oil at 2-2500km, 5000km, and then again at 8-10,000km and going on a regular oil change schedule from there. Also if it was an option I would use a decent magnet on the oil filter to boost collection of metal particulate, but if I'm not mistaken the ST's oil filter is a plastic cartridge-style and not a spin-on so I'm not sure how I'll get that to work, if it all. Maybe a rare earth magnet with some good heat-resistant tape. We'll see. I still don't have the car in my hands yet so we'll have to see what I can come up with.
 
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Location
Fort Worth, TX, USA
#10
First post. Got my explorer on Friday, and got it at barely 300 miles. I like that Beamer recommendation though. Happy to join the club!
 
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Location
Massachusetts
#11
Just hit 1100 miles of various driving, just changed the oil and filter last night.
 
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Location
WashDC
#12
Just hit 10K! Got an oil change and got the parts in to fix the driver's side heated seat (+ a grounding issue). Hopefully, gremlins are gone.
 
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Location
Houston, TX, USA
#14
I broke mine on just fine...WOT out of the dealers lot and tried to hit the speed limiter on the way home. I didn’t buy it to baby it.
 
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Location
Honolulu, HI, USA
#15
BMW and some other manufacturers have specific break in procedures. even the 20016-20 Ford Shelby GT350 does. However, I have not seen one for the ST. Is there one? I remember getting my 2011 Shelby American GT350 and requesting their recommendation. the reply was: "1) accelerate to red line. 2) shit to higher gear. 3) repeat #1 and #2 until reaching to top gear". Every engine, tire, drive train has a recommendation depending on the model and manufacturer. But what is the official word in print or the ST?
 
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Location
WashDC
#16
Seems like there has been a few posts about grounding issues. Is it a common issue
Mine has had a grounding issue. The shop said the internal Ford forum pointed out where the common grounding issue was located (passenger side of the engine, some component). Others are having their own Gremlins.

I still don't mind taking it in, growing pains exist for every new type vehicle.
 


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