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Old and Tired ST's

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East Freetown, MA
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2020 Explorer ST, Silver Spruce Metalic
#1
I'm just curious what people who have modded ST's will do with them when they get old and tired. I know the dealerships wouldn't give me crap for my Mustang when I tried to trade it in. I was able to finally sell it to someone but it took a while. I figure it will be the same with the ST once she get up there in age. I imagine some people who have the space would just store all the stock parts for when it comes time to sell. What will you do?
 

Cajun Heat

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#2
I'm just curious what people who have modded ST's will do with them when they get old and tired. I know the dealerships wouldn't give me crap for my Mustang when I tried to trade it in. I was able to finally sell it to someone but it took a while. I figure it will be the same with the ST once she get up there in age. I imagine some people who have the space would just store all the stock parts for when it comes time to sell. What will you do?
Right now the ST is my wife's daily and told me to stop messing with it or she will trade it in, so I stopped..lol. She plans on getting a different SUV within the next year, so I plan on keeping it. Once she is in something else I plan on doing turbo upgrades, fuel system, down pipes, and transmission. At that point it will be my go to when I want to go a little faster than my daily Ram 1500.
 

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San Francisco
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2022 ST
#3
Right now the ST is my wife's daily and told me to stop messing with it or she will trade it in, so I stopped..lol. She plans on getting a different SUV within the next year, so I plan on keeping it. Once she is in something else I plan on doing turbo upgrades, fuel system, down pipes, and transmission. At that point it will be my go to when I want to go a little faster than my daily Ram 1500.
She's just mad because you made it less street-able and have to keep taking it from her to work on it. lol

As for what to do with the ST when it's old? The same thing you do with any other performance vehicle. *shrug*
It will still be an acceptable daily driver/parent-mobile, and mods, it depends on how hard you want to go on it.
If you do things that make it more reliable and give it just a little pep, no problem.
All cars depreciate in value. Some enjoy a meteoric rise from the pit of despair but it takes some time. (Even the greatest. 911, Charger, Challenger, AMG, etc all plummet and pray for enthusiasts to bring them back up)
 

OP
BrooseDaMoose
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East Freetown, MA
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2020 Explorer ST, Silver Spruce Metalic
Thread Starter #4
I guess it's just because I drove my last two vehicles until they died. You're not going to drive an ST (or any forced induction vehicle) for more than 100K without rebuilding it. My 4.0 Ranger 4x4 currently has 280K and still going. I've had to replace the timing chains and the transmission but that's it. My Mustang was a toy, not a daily driver. I had $10k in the engine. It was a 10 second car so not for just anyone. The point I was getting at is these vehicles are good for about 100K miles before you start needing to rebuild turbos, head work, transmission work, etc. Do you put the money into it and keep driving it or try to get rid of it. For me, I'll probably be bored with this vehicle and want something new to start building. I've already got about $12K in it for mods. I was just curious what other would do once their ST's get old and tired.
 

UNBROKEN

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#5
I guess it's just because I drove my last two vehicles until they died. You're not going to drive an ST (or any forced induction vehicle) for more than 100K without rebuilding it. My 4.0 Ranger 4x4 currently has 280K and still going. I've had to replace the timing chains and the transmission but that's it. My Mustang was a toy, not a daily driver. I had $10k in the engine. It was a 10 second car so not for just anyone. The point I was getting at is these vehicles are good for about 100K miles before you start needing to rebuild turbos, head work, transmission work, etc. Do you put the money into it and keep driving it or try to get rid of it. For me, I'll probably be bored with this vehicle and want something new to start building. I've already got about $12K in it for mods. I was just curious what other would do once their ST's get old and tired.
Not sure where you get those stats but I can assure you there’s countless forced induction vehicles well north of 100K and still going strong. In Europe that’s considered a new car still. There’s plenty of ST’s over 100k also and mine isn’t far behind at 94K and it’s been heavily modded its entire life. 100k ain’t shit.
 

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Location
San Francisco
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2022 ST
#6
I guess it's just because I drove my last two vehicles until they died. You're not going to drive an ST (or any forced induction vehicle) for more than 100K without rebuilding it. My 4.0 Ranger 4x4 currently has 280K and still going. I've had to replace the timing chains and the transmission but that's it. My Mustang was a toy, not a daily driver. I had $10k in the engine. It was a 10 second car so not for just anyone. The point I was getting at is these vehicles are good for about 100K miles before you start needing to rebuild turbos, head work, transmission work, etc. Do you put the money into it and keep driving it or try to get rid of it. For me, I'll probably be bored with this vehicle and want something new to start building. I've already got about $12K in it for mods. I was just curious what other would do once their ST's get old and tired.
To be fair, it depends on what you do to a forced induction vehicle.
I had a multi-owner 91 Nissan 300ZX with 150K+miles on it, and besides the normal maintenance items, nothing had been done for repair besides injectors. (notoriously bad) I pulled the motor ~140K due to the EGR valve and something someone left loose, but my turbos were still good without any play.

How you treat a vehicle matters. YMMV, and anyone can have a defective part, but regular oil changes, full synthetic oil, not turning the key and burning out, not having the boost all the way to 11, those things add up.
 

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2022 ST
#7
Not sure where you get those stats but I can assure you there’s countless forced induction vehicles well north of 100K and still going strong. In Europe that’s considered a new car still. There’s plenty of ST’s over 100k also and mine isn’t far behind at 94K and it’s been heavily modded its entire life. 100k ain’t shit.

Right? 100K, you're barely at the timing belt maintenance. :ROFLMAO:
At the "accepted yearly average" that would mean that all turbo cars are dead at 8.5yrs - that would be before 10yr extended powertrain warranties. No manufacturer would ever put themselves in that position.
(Normal people do not pay to have turbos replaced, just us obsessed enthusiasts)

Hell, the Mini Cooper S has a 100K supercharger service to replace the oil - that's forced induction 100% of the time and they just change its fluid.
 

OP
BrooseDaMoose
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Thread Starter #8
Not sure where you get those stats but I can assure you there’s countless forced induction vehicles well north of 100K and still going strong. In Europe that’s considered a new car still. There’s plenty of ST’s over 100k also and mine isn’t far behind at 94K and it’s been heavily modded its entire life. 100k ain’t shit.
Like I said before, I've never had a turbo vehicle before. My mustang was supercharged and that required a rebuild at 80K miles. I'd be willing to bet that a vehicle that's heavily modded has been driven hard! When I first came here the first thing I read was about catch cans and why they are a must for these vehicles. I remeber reading somewhere that the heads need to come off to be walnut shell blasted around 80K. Any turbo needs rebuilding around 80-100K miles. Maybe that's all just speculation but even the SC on the jet ski calls for a rebuild at 100 hours!
 

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#9
... The heads "needing" walnut shelled is probably someone being extremely anal.
Yes, the cylinders are direct-injected which means fuel isn't passively cleaning some deposits, so catch cans are a really good idea, and yes, it can mean you have some buildup in the heads, but I don't think it requires shelling.

As for all turbos needing rebuilt at 100k? I haven't seen any evidence of that.
Ecoboost engines are out for years, cars using turbos for fuel efficiency, diesel trucks run millions of miles on them, etc - I haven't heard that hundreds of thousands of turbos are being replaced. all the time. *shrug*
 

UNBROKEN

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#10
Like I said before, I've never had a turbo vehicle before. My mustang was supercharged and that required a rebuild at 80K miles. I'd be willing to bet that a vehicle that's heavily modded has been driven hard! When I first came here the first thing I read was about catch cans and why they are a must for these vehicles. I remeber reading somewhere that the heads need to come off to be walnut shell blasted around 80K. Any turbo needs rebuilding around 80-100K miles. Maybe that's all just speculation but even the SC on the jet ski calls for a rebuild at 100 hours!
Yea you need to stop believing everything you read and enjoy your car.
 

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#11
FYI what usually kills turbos besides idiots going 7-9K miles between oil changes? dead lines.
Coolant lines, oil lines.

They are usually rubber, which means oil kills them. So the oil line or one of the seals starts to fail because of the extreme heat, then oil starts eating the line from the outside, then one or both fail then BOOM.
This is why people usually run braided oil lines, and switch to silicone coolant lines.

Those failures make friction high in a turbo, then it dies.
Dont let things leak for extended periods and you can get ahead of it
 

OP
BrooseDaMoose
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Thread Starter #12
Certainly can’t believe everything I read here! But I did go do some research on turbo longevity and the 80-100k mile rebuild went out a long time ago. Nowadays they can be expected to last upwards of 200K miles or the life of the engine given proper maintenance. I learned something new. But my original question was what will you do with your old and tired ST. I was wrong about that being at the approximate 100k mile mark. I’d like to continue enjoying my vehicle for as long as possible especially with the amount of money I’m sinking into it! Hopefully I will get to the 300K. I am just curious what others would do with their ST when it comes time to let it go or put it down.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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#13
If I let it go? It's because I found something new to love and I think I'll get a fair return for it.
Put it down? Viking funeral, or bury it with me. ;)

Honestly, I feel that no car is at its end at 100K mi, except maybe supercars.

What will likely happen? If my son matures enough, maybe I let him have it. Something fun to drive but not so valuable once he gets it that I would be pissed if he killed it.
(Better than these parents who buy kids new M-Class or AMGs, or even non-performance versions of those expensive cars)
 

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Prospect, KY
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2022 Ford Explorer ST
#14
It won't be worth much when I get something else so I am going to keep it as a beater. I know maintenance has been the best and it is nice to have an AWD here in KY with snow tires on occasion. It is nice to have an extra car when taking something to the shop or the kids need to borrow it.
 

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St. Louis
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2021 Explorer ST
#15
I'm keeping mine for awhile too. I have worked and lived in the city for 20 years. It's time to buy my wife the house she wants out in the burbs or country.
I fear there is a lot of ship-lap in my future.
#ifykyk
 



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